The Tradition Journal & Library Reloaded

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Edited between 2008 and 2010 The Tradition Journal was a publication entirely dedicated to Traditional Western Predictive Astrology. At the time there were no journals or publications specialised solely on Traditional Astrology, and The Tradition came to fill this gap. Later came the experimental project of The Tradition Library which published sources that were unavailable at the time.

Now, a decade after the last issue, The Tradition and its sister project, The Tradition Library are again available to students. Once more, as a decade ago, we seek to encourage the research and study of the Art, serving as a point of reference for those interested in the Tradition

Tradition-Library-logo

The Tradition Library. This project, active between 2009 and 2011, brought the work of the authors of the Western Predictive Tradition in the form of transcriptions of their texts (entire or in part), commentaries, historical birth data with original horoscopes where possible, and other materials. All  these texts are now available free of charge for the students of the Tradition.

To access The Tradition Journal and Tradition Library website, click the picture below:

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Tradition Library back online

After a long battle with thechnical problems the Tradition Library is back online!

NEW: Back issues of the Tradition Journal can now be purchased through the Tradition Library website.

Please click the logo below to open the Tradition Library page, or access it from the title bar on top of the page:

As always, we hope that astrologers will benefit from the publication of the papers available. Some are free of charge, but we hope that readers, downloading these files, will also make use of the ‘Donation’ facility. All your donations will help save animals lives, so please think of it as:

DONATE BEFORE DOWNLOAD

NEW – The Astrology of Comets

A new article with the title Between Science and Superstition – The Astrology of Comets has been published as an addendum to the Tradition Journal, Issue 4.

The article explains in detail the transmission of astrological lore concerning comets and provides an insight into the importance of the chapter on comets in Nicolaus Rensberger’s Astronomia Teutsch, first published in 1568.

The supplementary article can be found here: Astrology of Comets

The interested reader may as well find both, the article and the complete translation of Rensberger’s chapter on comets in the latest issue of the Tradition Journal.

NEW – Tradition Journal Issue 4

The Tradition Journal Issue 4 has just been released:

Contents:

The Role of Dispositors of Planets in Signs

By Martien Hermes

Fit to be Judged: The Necessity of the 23 Considerations Before Judgement

By Christopher Magnus

Between Science and Superstition – The Astrology of Comets

By Peter Stockinger

For Posterity – Rensberger on Comets

Transcription by Peter Stockinger

Incarnation – Reincarnation

By Sue Ward

Book Reviews

This issue is available in PDF and EPUB (ebook) format and inclues a complemetary copy of William Lilly’s autobiography transcribed and annotated by Sue Ward.

Copies may be purchased via the website: Tradition Journal

The Tradition Library

This is a new project provoding interested astrologers with the work of the authors of the Western Predictive Tradition in the form of transcriptions of their works (entire or in part), commentaries on these works, historical birth data with original horoscopes where possible, and various smaller pieces on these themes.

Highly recommended and to be found at: http://traditionlibrary.com/publications.html

“Monster of Ingratitude” – The Relationship between William Lilly and John Gadbury

Sue Ward and I have just completed a paper entitled “Monster of Ingratitude” which will be published in the forthcoming edition of “The Tradition” journal (due to be released in September).

Scholarship into the history of astrology has improved over the last ten or fifteen years and has brought us a huge amount of information regarding astrology’s development from many perspectives. However, biographical information about those who practiced astrology in centuries past is not of such a high standard. There are several reasons for this, not least an apparent lack of autobiographical material. It was from this point of view that Sue and I examined the relationship between William Lilly and John Gadbury.

This rather large piece of research has taken several months to complete, but still leaves many questions unanswered. However, what we did discover was that those few biographies of William Lilly are markedly flawed. Most researchers rely upon Derek Parker’s “Familiar to All” which, whilst it presents one of the earliest biographical texts about Lilly and which hasn’t been bettered, presents very few sources as grounds for the author’s opinions. Nonetheless, it is those opinions that we find most frequently in subsequent biographies of the astrologers of 17th century England, particularly those of Lilly and Gadbury. Indeed, much of the personal detail regarding Lilly’s life found in Parker, can be found nowhere else. It may be that Parker had access to material unknown to us, but there are no references with which to follow this up. (It may be that a full and detailed review of “Familiar to All” is required in order to test the assertions made there against known sources.)

We have attempted to address these, largely unsubstantiated, opinions and present source material which leads to alternative, and often very different, conclusions. As an example, the main theme of our paper is the infamous contention between Lilly and Gadbury and our research shows that it has been misconstrued by historians throughout. This study has brought to light a number of other doubtful areas relating to Lilly’s contemporaries, too, but our remit precluded going very far with that; we had already far exceeded our original intentions.

The paper contains:

  • brief biographies of the two men;
  • the beginning of their acqaintance and how it came about;
  • how the enmity began, developed and ended;
  • the rather one-sided pamphlet war;
  • others involved in the contention;
  • a study of the published material;
  • all sources of information;
  • alternative conclusions based on the above.

We hope to draw the attention of astrologers to an area which requires far closer attention than it has attracted hitherto, and perhaps encourage others to proceed in this research. Furthermore, we hope to demonstrate that Gadbury’s work is far from reliable and could easily be replaced by that of a better qualified author of the period, such as John Partridge. That is, if astrologers want to investigate the art as it stood post-Lilly and as it collided with the new science.